Lucene/Solr and Java versions, what we know

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Lucene/Solr and Java versions, what we know

Erick Erickson
So I assume everyone thinks I’ve nailed it perfectly with this page? https://wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrJavaVersions. ‘cause I haven’t seen much feedback.

Look, we give _no_ guidance at this point about whether Lucene/Solr even work on Java X. Well, I guess we’re saying Solr 9 works on with Java 11. Or at least it will since it’s about to be required.

I don’t particularly care if we say “If you’re upgrading Java, use Java 11” for Lucene/Solr 8x or 7x or 6x for that matter. Let’s just get our collective act together and give some guidance.





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Re: Lucene/Solr and Java versions, what we know

Jan Høydahl / Cominvent
Because the Reference Guide is versioned, we only need to discuss what JDK to grab that works with e.g. Solr/Lucene 8. But I think your wiki page is great do as an in-depth guide to JDKs and compatibility. Perhaps it can just live on the wiki as now, and link to it from the RefGuide?

So on the https://lucene.apache.org/solr/guide/7_7/solr-system-requirements.html page, right now we just say "You will need the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) version 1.8 or higher" and then people to download Oracle Java.

I think instead of linking to only the Oracle paid version, we could say something like:

If you do not have any opinion or requirements on a particular distribution or version of Java, we recommend that you install the free, Open Source OpenJDK version 11 which is the latest LTS (long term support) version. You can download it from many sources such as AdoptOpenJDK (link), Amazon Corretto (link), Zulu (link) or Oracle (link). We do not endorse any particular vendor. Note that each vendor may have different policies for bug- and security fixes, so choose one you are comfortable with. You may also find that your Operating System already includes a supported version of the JDK.

There are also commercial paid version of Java. If your organisation has a policy on what vendor or version or Java to use, make sure to consult that before deciding.

For a more in-depth discussion of JDK compatibility, known issues etc for various versions of Lucene/Solr and Java, please see xxxxx.

For security reasons, Java should be kept up to date on minor versions. Never upgrade Java to a higher major version before first checking and testing that it is compatible with the version of Solr you have.

--
Jan Høydahl, search solution architect
Cominvent AS - www.cominvent.com

26. mar. 2019 kl. 16:14 skrev Erick Erickson <[hidden email]>:

So I assume everyone thinks I’ve nailed it perfectly with this page? https://wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrJavaVersions. ‘cause I haven’t seen much feedback.

Look, we give _no_ guidance at this point about whether Lucene/Solr even work on Java X. Well, I guess we’re saying Solr 9 works on with Java 11. Or at least it will since it’s about to be required.

I don’t particularly care if we say “If you’re upgrading Java, use Java 11” for Lucene/Solr 8x or 7x or 6x for that matter. Let’s just get our collective act together and give some guidance.





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Re: Lucene/Solr and Java versions, what we know

Alexandre Rafalovitch
In reply to this post by Erick Erickson
Side note: Isn't wiki going away? I saw message on Commons list 4 days ago:

"Infra is decommissioning the MoinMoin wiki software that runs the wiki.a.o system in May.  That means all the content there needs to be.migrated to new systems if it's still relevant."

Regards,
     Alex

On Tue, Mar 26, 2019, 11:39 AM Erick Erickson, <[hidden email]> wrote:
So I assume everyone thinks I’ve nailed it perfectly with this page? https://wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrJavaVersions. ‘cause I haven’t seen much feedback.

Look, we give _no_ guidance at this point about whether Lucene/Solr even work on Java X. Well, I guess we’re saying Solr 9 works on with Java 11. Or at least it will since it’s about to be required.

I don’t particularly care if we say “If you’re upgrading Java, use Java 11” for Lucene/Solr 8x or 7x or 6x for that matter. Let’s just get our collective act together and give some guidance.





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Re: Lucene/Solr and Java versions, what we know

Walter Underwood
In reply to this post by Jan Høydahl / Cominvent
I think it is appropriate to have the table in the reference guide. Yes, the guide is versioned, but we can’t expect people to manually diff two versions to figure out what changed.

If we expect people to upgrade to a new version, we should have the table in the reference guide, not hidden in a wiki.

wunder
Walter Underwood
[hidden email]
http://observer.wunderwood.org/  (my blog)

On Mar 27, 2019, at 1:24 AM, Jan Høydahl <[hidden email]> wrote:

Because the Reference Guide is versioned, we only need to discuss what JDK to grab that works with e.g. Solr/Lucene 8. But I think your wiki page is great do as an in-depth guide to JDKs and compatibility. Perhaps it can just live on the wiki as now, and link to it from the RefGuide?

So on the https://lucene.apache.org/solr/guide/7_7/solr-system-requirements.html page, right now we just say "You will need the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) version 1.8 or higher" and then people to download Oracle Java.

I think instead of linking to only the Oracle paid version, we could say something like:

If you do not have any opinion or requirements on a particular distribution or version of Java, we recommend that you install the free, Open Source OpenJDK version 11 which is the latest LTS (long term support) version. You can download it from many sources such as AdoptOpenJDK (link), Amazon Corretto (link), Zulu (link) or Oracle (link). We do not endorse any particular vendor. Note that each vendor may have different policies for bug- and security fixes, so choose one you are comfortable with. You may also find that your Operating System already includes a supported version of the JDK.

There are also commercial paid version of Java. If your organisation has a policy on what vendor or version or Java to use, make sure to consult that before deciding.

For a more in-depth discussion of JDK compatibility, known issues etc for various versions of Lucene/Solr and Java, please see xxxxx.

For security reasons, Java should be kept up to date on minor versions. Never upgrade Java to a higher major version before first checking and testing that it is compatible with the version of Solr you have.

--
Jan Høydahl, search solution architect
Cominvent AS - www.cominvent.com

26. mar. 2019 kl. 16:14 skrev Erick Erickson <[hidden email]>:

So I assume everyone thinks I’ve nailed it perfectly with this page? https://wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrJavaVersions. ‘cause I haven’t seen much feedback.

Look, we give _no_ guidance at this point about whether Lucene/Solr even work on Java X. Well, I guess we’re saying Solr 9 works on with Java 11. Or at least it will since it’s about to be required.

I don’t particularly care if we say “If you’re upgrading Java, use Java 11” for Lucene/Solr 8x or 7x or 6x for that matter. Let’s just get our collective act together and give some guidance.





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Re: Lucene/Solr and Java versions, what we know

Erick Erickson
In reply to this post by Jan Høydahl / Cominvent
I think what I’m tending towards is mostly to fill the information vacuum we presently have. When someone asks “can we run Solr X with Java Y”, our only answer is “I dunno. There are all these tests we regularly run, so look through the Lucene/Solr JIRAs and figure it out for yourself”.

Alexandre:

Yes, the Wiki is going away. I consider it temporary because it’s easier to edit than the website and I was hoping others would just edit it.

Walter:

Problem here is that there won’t be any entries for any ref guide prior to 8.1 (at best), we’re not going to go back and re-publish them all just to add this. So someone asking “can I run Solr 7.7 on JDK 11” would have to look in the 8.1 reference guide which is confusing as well.

Maybe going forward, rather than a table about all versions, just a short statement in the ref guide about the versions of Java that version was tested with?

Jan:

I think rather than recommend, what I’d like to do is give users some feel for what we test regularly. If we “recommend”, there’s an expectation that we'll support it. That said, I like your idea about linking in other sources. We should be vendor-agnostic, OTOH trying to test a zillion different versions is a rats nest.


Thanks all. I’ll probably update that page this weekend and move it to the website sometime later.

> On Mar 27, 2019, at 1:24 AM, Jan Høydahl <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Because the Reference Guide is versioned, we only need to discuss what JDK to grab that works with e.g. Solr/Lucene 8. But I think your wiki page is great do as an in-depth guide to JDKs and compatibility. Perhaps it can just live on the wiki as now, and link to it from the RefGuide?
>
> So on the https://lucene.apache.org/solr/guide/7_7/solr-system-requirements.html page, right now we just say "You will need the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) version 1.8 or higher" and then people to download Oracle Java.
>
> I think instead of linking to only the Oracle paid version, we could say something like:
>
> If you do not have any opinion or requirements on a particular distribution or version of Java, we recommend that you install the free, Open Source OpenJDK version 11 which is the latest LTS (long term support) version. You can download it from many sources such as AdoptOpenJDK (link), Amazon Corretto (link), Zulu (link) or Oracle (link). We do not endorse any particular vendor. Note that each vendor may have different policies for bug- and security fixes, so choose one you are comfortable with. You may also find that your Operating System already includes a supported version of the JDK.
>
> There are also commercial paid version of Java. If your organisation has a policy on what vendor or version or Java to use, make sure to consult that before deciding.
>
> For a more in-depth discussion of JDK compatibility, known issues etc for various versions of Lucene/Solr and Java, please see xxxxx.
>
> For security reasons, Java should be kept up to date on minor versions. Never upgrade Java to a higher major version before first checking and testing that it is compatible with the version of Solr you have.
>
> --
> Jan Høydahl, search solution architect
> Cominvent AS - www.cominvent.com
>
>> 26. mar. 2019 kl. 16:14 skrev Erick Erickson <[hidden email]>:
>>
>> So I assume everyone thinks I’ve nailed it perfectly with this page? https://wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrJavaVersions. ‘cause I haven’t seen much feedback.
>>
>> Look, we give _no_ guidance at this point about whether Lucene/Solr even work on Java X. Well, I guess we’re saying Solr 9 works on with Java 11. Or at least it will since it’s about to be required.
>>
>> I don’t particularly care if we say “If you’re upgrading Java, use Java 11” for Lucene/Solr 8x or 7x or 6x for that matter. Let’s just get our collective act together and give some guidance.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>
>


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Re: Lucene/Solr and Java versions, what we know

Walter Underwood
On Mar 27, 2019, at 9:03 AM, Erick Erickson <[hidden email]> wrote:

Problem here is that there won’t be any entries for any ref guide prior to 8.1 (at best), we’re not going to go back and re-publish them all just to add this. So someone asking “can I run Solr 7.7 on JDK 11” would have to look in the 8.1 reference guide which is confusing as well.

I don’t have any problem with that.

Consider someone upgrading from 7.x to 8.x. They might upgreade the JVM first, if they know that 7.x runs on that JVM version. Then upgrade Solr. 

wunder
Walter Underwood
[hidden email]
http://observer.wunderwood.org/  (my blog)

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Re: Lucene/Solr and Java versions, what we know

david.w.smiley@gmail.com
In reply to this post by Walter Underwood
+1 to put in the ref guide; well put Walter.

~ David Smiley
Apache Lucene/Solr Search Developer


On Wed, Mar 27, 2019 at 10:27 AM Walter Underwood <[hidden email]> wrote:
I think it is appropriate to have the table in the reference guide. Yes, the guide is versioned, but we can’t expect people to manually diff two versions to figure out what changed.

If we expect people to upgrade to a new version, we should have the table in the reference guide, not hidden in a wiki.

wunder
Walter Underwood
[hidden email]
http://observer.wunderwood.org/  (my blog)

On Mar 27, 2019, at 1:24 AM, Jan Høydahl <[hidden email]> wrote:

Because the Reference Guide is versioned, we only need to discuss what JDK to grab that works with e.g. Solr/Lucene 8. But I think your wiki page is great do as an in-depth guide to JDKs and compatibility. Perhaps it can just live on the wiki as now, and link to it from the RefGuide?

So on the https://lucene.apache.org/solr/guide/7_7/solr-system-requirements.html page, right now we just say "You will need the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) version 1.8 or higher" and then people to download Oracle Java.

I think instead of linking to only the Oracle paid version, we could say something like:

If you do not have any opinion or requirements on a particular distribution or version of Java, we recommend that you install the free, Open Source OpenJDK version 11 which is the latest LTS (long term support) version. You can download it from many sources such as AdoptOpenJDK (link), Amazon Corretto (link), Zulu (link) or Oracle (link). We do not endorse any particular vendor. Note that each vendor may have different policies for bug- and security fixes, so choose one you are comfortable with. You may also find that your Operating System already includes a supported version of the JDK.

There are also commercial paid version of Java. If your organisation has a policy on what vendor or version or Java to use, make sure to consult that before deciding.

For a more in-depth discussion of JDK compatibility, known issues etc for various versions of Lucene/Solr and Java, please see xxxxx.

For security reasons, Java should be kept up to date on minor versions. Never upgrade Java to a higher major version before first checking and testing that it is compatible with the version of Solr you have.

--
Jan Høydahl, search solution architect
Cominvent AS - www.cominvent.com

26. mar. 2019 kl. 16:14 skrev Erick Erickson <[hidden email]>:

So I assume everyone thinks I’ve nailed it perfectly with this page? https://wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrJavaVersions. ‘cause I haven’t seen much feedback.

Look, we give _no_ guidance at this point about whether Lucene/Solr even work on Java X. Well, I guess we’re saying Solr 9 works on with Java 11. Or at least it will since it’s about to be required.

I don’t particularly care if we say “If you’re upgrading Java, use Java 11” for Lucene/Solr 8x or 7x or 6x for that matter. Let’s just get our collective act together and give some guidance.





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