ESP - Ethics search protocol for internet search engines.

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
6 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

ESP - Ethics search protocol for internet search engines.

Bernhard Fastenrath

I'm working on an ethics search protocol for internet search engines.
Could this be an interesting idea for nutch?

http://www.nongnu.org/esp/

An ethics-enabled search engine can act as a *complement* to the
well-known price search engines and turn ethical considerations into an
easily advertisable advantage. A search engine can store imprint and
ethics of organizations that publish them and allow users to find
organizations adhering to the desired ethics and also to verify these
ethics or the public feedback of organizations or individuals that
verify those ethics and an organization's adherance to its ethics in
detail.

Users of this system can demand ethics and support non-government
organization that try to uphold environmental, social or other ethics.
Gathering data from user profiles is expected from search engines as
users specify the ethics they are looking for and the policy providers,
certification agents and verification agents they would like to see.

A search engine must return hits according to the quality of matching
ethics, if no other criteria was specified to supercede this.

Unsatisfied users can post tickets in a well-defined format to policy
providers or verification agents to remind policy implementors to adhere
to the ethics they have published. Policy providers and verification
agents can declare a published social contract document as (partially)
invalid or revoke (self-) certifications. Users can also annotate
policies or social contracts and inform others about their private
opinion about the adherence or non-adherence of a policy implementor.
Mediators should be used to mediate in case of dispute as legal steps
are frowned upon (there is a base policy that disallows legal steps
where mediation would be appropriate) and can increase the number of
negative annotations.

Policies can extend *policy schemes* (inherting the structure of an
empty policy) or extend another policy that has not been declared final.
A final policy is not open to be extended. Extending a policy means that
paragraphs can be overridden or appended. The implementation of a policy
refers to the use of a policy in a social contract.

In an analogy to the Java language one could refer to policy schemes as
interfaces and policies as classes but where Java nomenclatur would be
to implement a scheme (instead of extending it), the term "implement"
refers to what would be the instantiation of a policy in Java, because a
policy implementation is the act of adding a policy to one's social
contract. Such an "instance" of a policy is parametrized by a single
argument, which is the implementation level. Further parametrization may
be added in the future, when the search facilities for policy parameters
are sufficiently standardized.

Policies should be structured to describe concisely *what* is required
by a policy, not *why* it is required or *how* it is to be implemented.
It should be considered good style to add links to external web pages
describing the *why* and *how* to every paragraph that requires further
explanations. Explanations should preferrably come in different degrees
of verbosity and sophistication but aim to explain the connection to
Kant's Categorical Imperative
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categorical_Imperative>.


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: ESP - Ethics search protocol for internet search engines.

Erik Hatcher
It would seem that RDF and the Creative Commons plugin would be very  
related to what you're doing.  I'm curious if you've given RDF  
consideration in this and how that would factor into it?

     Erik


On Jul 9, 2005, at 8:22 AM, Bernhard Fastenrath wrote:

>
> I'm working on an ethics search protocol for internet search engines.
> Could this be an interesting idea for nutch?
>
> http://www.nongnu.org/esp/
>
> An ethics-enabled search engine can act as a *complement* to the  
> well-known price search engines and turn ethical considerations  
> into an easily advertisable advantage. A search engine can store  
> imprint and ethics of organizations that publish them and allow  
> users to find organizations adhering to the desired ethics and also  
> to verify these ethics or the public feedback of organizations or  
> individuals that verify those ethics and an organization's  
> adherance to its ethics in detail.
>
> Users of this system can demand ethics and support non-government  
> organization that try to uphold environmental, social or other  
> ethics. Gathering data from user profiles is expected from search  
> engines as users specify the ethics they are looking for and the  
> policy providers, certification agents and verification agents they  
> would like to see.
>
> A search engine must return hits according to the quality of  
> matching ethics, if no other criteria was specified to supercede this.
>
> Unsatisfied users can post tickets in a well-defined format to  
> policy providers or verification agents to remind policy  
> implementors to adhere to the ethics they have published. Policy  
> providers and verification agents can declare a published social  
> contract document as (partially) invalid or revoke (self-)  
> certifications. Users can also annotate policies or social  
> contracts and inform others about their private opinion about the  
> adherence or non-adherence of a policy implementor. Mediators  
> should be used to mediate in case of dispute as legal steps are  
> frowned upon (there is a base policy that disallows legal steps  
> where mediation would be appropriate) and can increase the number  
> of negative annotations.
>
> Policies can extend *policy schemes* (inherting the structure of an  
> empty policy) or extend another policy that has not been declared  
> final. A final policy is not open to be extended. Extending a  
> policy means that paragraphs can be overridden or appended. The  
> implementation of a policy refers to the use of a policy in a  
> social contract.
>
> In an analogy to the Java language one could refer to policy  
> schemes as interfaces and policies as classes but where Java  
> nomenclatur would be to implement a scheme (instead of extending  
> it), the term "implement" refers to what would be the instantiation  
> of a policy in Java, because a policy implementation is the act of  
> adding a policy to one's social contract. Such an "instance" of a  
> policy is parametrized by a single argument, which is the  
> implementation level. Further parametrization may be added in the  
> future, when the search facilities for policy parameters are  
> sufficiently standardized.
>
> Policies should be structured to describe concisely *what* is  
> required by a policy, not *why* it is required or *how* it is to be  
> implemented. It should be considered good style to add links to  
> external web pages describing the *why* and *how* to every  
> paragraph that requires further explanations. Explanations should  
> preferrably come in different degrees of verbosity and  
> sophistication but aim to explain the connection to Kant's  
> Categorical Imperative <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ 
> Categorical_Imperative>.
>
>
>

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: ESP - Ethics search protocol for internet search engines.

Bernhard Fastenrath
Erik Hatcher wrote:

> It would seem that RDF and the Creative Commons plugin would be very  
> related to what you're doing.  I'm curious if you've given RDF  
> consideration in this and how that would factor into it?

No I haven't considered RDF because what I'm trying to specify follows a
very simple model:

Documents that make distinct human readable statements and allow a limited
classification inside the documents, by following document schemes, and a
good classification outside, by following inheritance trees of derived
documents.

There is no meta language (in my current specification) describing
aspects of the
content of the documents and I cannot see an advantage in trying to describe
ethics in a computer readable format.

Maybe I didn't understand why you suggest to use RDF?

Creative commons is only related to my project in that creative commons
licenses could be an intersting search criteria. Web services that offer
content under creative commons could, for example, advertise an ethical
policy that guarantees all content to be available under creative
commons licenses.

What use of the Creative Commons plugin where you suggesting specifically?

>     Erik

--
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Fasten/YHVH_language_description

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: ESP - Ethics search protocol for internet search engines.

Erik Hatcher

On Jul 10, 2005, at 9:30 AM, Bernhard Fastenrath wrote:

> Erik Hatcher wrote:
>
>
>> It would seem that RDF and the Creative Commons plugin would be  
>> very  related to what you're doing.  I'm curious if you've given  
>> RDF  consideration in this and how that would factor into it?
>>
>
> No I haven't considered RDF because what I'm trying to specify  
> follows a very simple model:
>
> Documents that make distinct human readable statements and allow a  
> limited
> classification inside the documents, by following document schemes,  
> and a
> good classification outside, by following inheritance trees of  
> derived documents.
>
> There is no meta language (in my current specification) describing  
> aspects of the
> content of the documents and I cannot see an advantage in trying to  
> describe
> ethics in a computer readable format.

>
> Maybe I didn't understand why you suggest to use RDF?

I must be misunderstanding then.  The website you linked to had this:  
http://www.nongnu.org/esp/#XML_Examples - so I presumed some machine  
readable thing going on under the covers.

You also mentioned the analogy to Java classes and interfaces, which  
is something RDF represents as well.

> Creative commons is only related to my project in that creative  
> commons
> licenses could be an intersting search criteria. Web services that  
> offer
> content under creative commons could, for example, advertise an  
> ethical
> policy that guarantees all content to be available under creative  
> commons licenses.
>
> What use of the Creative Commons plugin where you suggesting  
> specifically?

I mentioned CC because it parses embedded RDF data that is making a  
statement about the resources available from that page.  I thought  
the connection between making statements about ethics could be made  
similarly.

Apparently I'm missing the idea of what you're doing with Nutch and  
how you are representing ethical policies.

     Erik

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: ESP - Ethics search protocol for internet search engines.

Bernhard Fastenrath
Erik Hatcher wrote:

>> Maybe I didn't understand why you suggest to use RDF?
>
> I must be misunderstanding then.  The website you linked to had this:  
> http://www.nongnu.org/esp/#XML_Examples - so I presumed some machine  
> readable thing going on under the covers.

I've got three different document types: SocialContract, Policy and Imprint.
SocialContract and Imprint are XML formatted content that is machine
readable down to the simple types.

The Policy document type is a document that mostly consists of human
readable text and can be converted to (e.g.)  XHTML by a XSLT processor.
The reason for the Policy document not being XHTML formatted is that
it can follow a predefined structure to allow a certain degree of
classification
of its content by analyzing that structure. Also a Policy document allows
for much less arbitrary and superfluous formatting information than an XHTML
document.

You were right in assuming that something machine readable is going on:
A search engine can process imprint, social contract and policies of an
entity advertising these and can consequently allow an interested user
to search for information that was previously unavailable.

You get (hopefully) uniquely identified entities with identifieable
services,
products, contact and address information and, above all, ethical standards.

The ethical standards are broken down sufficiently into machine readable
content that a search engine user can request ethical standards for the
organizations or services he or she is looking for by specifiying groups of
policies or (further policy groups) that are to be implemented collectively
or alternatively, thus allowing arbitrarily complex expressions of AND
and OR clauses for ethical policies and available implementation levels
of these policies.
<http://dict.leo.org/se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=superfluous>

> You also mentioned the analogy to Java classes and interfaces, which  
> is something RDF represents as well.

That statement was mostly to correct a wording I used earlier, which
stated that
policy schemes were like Java interfaces and could be implemented. I didn't
think about the confusion this would create for the user, when a policy
scheme
could be implemented by a policy, which then could be extended by another
policy to be, finally, implemented again, by a social contract. That was
a poor
choice of terminology and needed to be corrected.

>> Creative commons is only related to my project in that creative  commons
>> licenses could be an intersting search criteria. Web services that  
>> offer
>> content under creative commons could, for example, advertise an  ethical
>> policy that guarantees all content to be available under creative  
>> commons licenses.
>>
>> What use of the Creative Commons plugin where you suggesting  
>> specifically?
>
> I mentioned CC because it parses embedded RDF data that is making a  
> statement about the resources available from that page.  I thought  
> the connection between making statements about ethics could be made  
> similarly.

That is conceivable. I just haven't considered using RDF yet and it seems
to me that RDF would be more complicated.

> Apparently I'm missing the idea of what you're doing with Nutch and  
> how you are representing ethical policies.

I'm not doing anything with nutch yet, I just have an idea that might be
useful and
I'm looking for a context for a reference implementation, which nutch
could be.

Bernhard

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Re: ESP - Ethics search protocol for internet search engines.

Erik Hatcher

On Jul 10, 2005, at 3:58 PM, Bernhard Fastenrath wrote:
>> I mentioned CC because it parses embedded RDF data that is making  
>> a  statement about the resources available from that page.  I  
>> thought  the connection between making statements about ethics  
>> could be made  similarly.
>>
>
> That is conceivable. I just haven't considered using RDF yet and it  
> seems
> to me that RDF would be more complicated.

Perhaps in the short term it would be, but it is "Resource  
Description Framework" and the idea seems to be to describe resources  
within an ethical policy context.

I'm just now getting into RDF myself, so it is my current hammer of  
which I currently understand only a fraction.

     Erik