Jetty for production?

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Jetty for production?

Wade Leftwich-4
Hi,

I just posted a question about configuring Tomcat's SecurityManager for
SOLR, but then got to wondering if I might not be asking the wrong question.

If the only servlet I intend to run on my production server is SOLR,
then why not use Jetty? Does anyone on the list have experience using
Jetty in production? We're a python-perl-and-php shop, and do not plan
to get any further into Java than we have to. (SOLR is good enough to
overcome our anti-Java bias.)

Any observations or advice appreciated.

Wade Leftwich
Ithaca, NY
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Re: Jetty for production?

WHIRLYCOTT
On Nov 11, 2006, at 9:31 PM, Wade Leftwich wrote:

> If the only servlet I intend to run on my production server is SOLR,
> then why not use Jetty? Does anyone on the list have experience using
> Jetty in production? We're a python-perl-and-php shop, and do not plan

Yes, Jetty is powering stylefeeder.com (the webapp) as well as our  
Solr installation.  It's super.  It's very simple, stable and works  
great.

phil.

--
                                    Whirlycott
                                    Philip Jacob
                                    [hidden email]
                                    http://www.whirlycott.com/phil/


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Re: Jetty for production?

Chris Hostetter-3
In reply to this post by Wade Leftwich-4

: If the only servlet I intend to run on my production server is SOLR,
: then why not use Jetty? Does anyone on the list have experience using

Just to clarify: therees no particular reason why Jetty would be a better
choice just if your only need for a servlet container is Solr.  the Solr
example app has jetty in it just because at the time we set it up, Jetty
was the simplest/smallest servlet container we found that could be run
easily in a cross platform way (ie: "java -jar start.jar") that shouldn't
be interpreted as a recomendation that Solr runs better under Jetty --
just that Jetty made doing the demo easier.

I personally have a lot of experience with Resin -- but that's just
because It's what my work uses.  From what I've seen of Tomcat and
Jetty I like Tomcat a lot more then Jetty because the configuration just
seems to make a hell of a lot more sense, and I can find a lot more
documentation on it -- I have no idea which one Solr performs better in.



-Hoss

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Re: Jetty for production?

Otis Gospodnetic-2
In reply to this post by Wade Leftwich-4
Three thumbs up for Jetty from me!
What you see on simpy.com is powered by Jetty, and much of what you see on technorati.com uses Jetty (its HTTP handler, not the whole servlet container).

Otis

----- Original Message ----
From: Wade Leftwich <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Saturday, November 11, 2006 9:31:53 PM
Subject: Jetty for production?

Hi,

I just posted a question about configuring Tomcat's SecurityManager for
SOLR, but then got to wondering if I might not be asking the wrong question.

If the only servlet I intend to run on my production server is SOLR,
then why not use Jetty? Does anyone on the list have experience using
Jetty in production? We're a python-perl-and-php shop, and do not plan
to get any further into Java than we have to. (SOLR is good enough to
overcome our anti-Java bias.)

Any observations or advice appreciated.

Wade Leftwich
Ithaca, NY



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Re: Jetty for production?

PanosJee
Personally i have deployed SOLR within a PHP, AJAX framework
I just have just deployed Jetty for SOLR and i created a PHP wrapper so
that i can send XML docs to SOLR and returns JSON. Besides that i have
filtered the traffic to Jetty and only the PHP wrapper can access it. So
it is super easy, super fast and quite secure...