Solr, c/s type ?

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Solr, c/s type ?

Jason
i'm wondering c/s type is possible (not http web type).
if possible, could i get the material about it?

Thanks,
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Re: Solr, c/s type ?

Chris Hostetter-3

: Subject: Solr, c/s type ?
:
: i'm wondering c/s type is possible (not http web type).
: if possible, could i get the material about it?

You're going t oneed to provide more info exaplining what it is you are
asking baout -- i don't know about anyone else, but i honestly have
absolutely no idea what you might possibly mean by "c/s type is possible
(not http web type)"

-Hoss

--
http://lucenerevolution.org/  ...  October 7-8, Boston
http://bit.ly/stump-hoss      ...  Stump The Chump!

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Re: Solr, c/s type ?

Travis Low
I'll guess he means client/server.

On Tue, Sep 7, 2010 at 5:52 PM, Chris Hostetter <[hidden email]>wrote:

>
> : Subject: Solr, c/s type ?
> :
> : i'm wondering c/s type is possible (not http web type).
> : if possible, could i get the material about it?
>
> You're going t oneed to provide more info exaplining what it is you are
> asking baout -- i don't know about anyone else, but i honestly have
> absolutely no idea what you might possibly mean by "c/s type is possible
> (not http web type)"
>
> -Hoss
>
> --
> http://lucenerevolution.org/  ...  October 7-8, Boston
> http://bit.ly/stump-hoss      ...  Stump The Chump!
>
>
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RE: Solr, c/s type ?

Jonathan Rochkind
> I'll guess he means client/server.

HTTP is a client/server protocol, isn't it?  
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Re: Solr, c/s type ?

Jason
In reply to this post by Jason
I'd just like to use solr for in-house which is not web application.
But I don't know how should i do?
Thanks,
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Re: Solr, c/s type ?

gearond
You would set up a Java server (container) and run Solr/Lucene. Not sure how to do the following, but then you block the standard port for Solr/Lucene on that machine from being accessible except locally.

In whatever code/applicaiton that you are working with, on that machine, you then use it's libraries to access 'the web', but only actually the 'localhost' 127.0.0.1, usually, @ the port for Solr/Lucene.

Learn, learn, learn, and study some more about using/modifiying data importers, indexes, putting in filters, stemmmers,shinglers, carpenters (joke), blah, blah, blah, and last but not least, the almight QUERY to access the index, filters, etc.

Then you will have a local search engine on whatever data you had put into it.

There is also the 'embedded server' which I have only heard about. Anybody else on this list other than me is much more experienced in general, and can advise you better on those.

Dennis Gearon

Signature Warning
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  otherwise we all die.

Read 'Hot, Flat, and Crowded'
Laugh at http://www.yert.com/film.php


--- On Wed, 9/8/10, Jason, Kim <[hidden email]> wrote:

> From: Jason, Kim <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: Solr, c/s type ?
> To: [hidden email]
> Date: Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 9:32 PM
>
> I'd just like to use solr for in-house which is not web
> application.
> But I don't know how should i do?
> Thanks,
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://lucene.472066.n3.nabble.com/Solr-c-s-type-tp1392952p1444175.html
> Sent from the Solr - User mailing list archive at
> Nabble.com.
>
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RE: Solr, c/s type ?

Jonathan Rochkind
In reply to this post by Jason
You _could_ use SolrJ with EmbeddedSolrServer.  But personally I wouldn't unless there's a reason to.  There's no automatic reason not to use the ordinary Solr HTTP api, even for an in-house application which is not a web application.  Unless you have a real reason to use embedded solr, I'd use the HTTP api, possibly via SolrJ if your local application is Java.

http://wiki.apache.org/solr/Solrj

In my (very limited, so if someone else knows better and has something to say, listen to them) experience, using EmbeddedSolrServer ends up biting you down the line, it doesn't work _quite_ like ordinary/typical Solr, and some things end up not working. And you're going to be mostly on your own for scaling/concurrency issues. Why re-invent the wheel when ordinary HTTP solr already works so well?  But EmbeddedSolrServer is there, if you actually have a need for it.  But there's no reason you can't use Solr's HTTP api for a non-web application, the fact that your application talks to Solr over HTTP does not mean your application has to talk to it's users over HTTP, two different things.

Incidentally, using EmbeddedSolrServer would in fact _not_ be a "client/server" setup between your app and solr, per your original question. HTTP is a client/server protocol, using the ordinary Solr HTTP api is the way to set up a "client/server" relationship between your app and Solr.

Jonathan
________________________________________
From: Jason, Kim [[hidden email]]
Sent: Thursday, September 09, 2010 12:32 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Solr, c/s type ?

I'd just like to use solr for in-house which is not web application.
But I don't know how should i do?
Thanks,

--
View this message in context: http://lucene.472066.n3.nabble.com/Solr-c-s-type-tp1392952p1444175.html
Sent from the Solr - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
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Re: Solr, c/s type ?

Yonik Seeley-2-2
On Thu, Sep 9, 2010 at 1:20 AM, Jonathan Rochkind <[hidden email]> wrote:
> You _could_ use SolrJ with EmbeddedSolrServer.  But personally I wouldn't unless there's a reason to.  There's no automatic reason not to use the ordinary Solr HTTP api, even for an in-house application which is not a web application.  Unless you have a real reason to use embedded solr, I'd use the HTTP api, possibly via SolrJ if your local application is Java.


Right.  Some people associate HTTP with "slow", but it's just not so.
HTTP is just a TCP socket with some small standard headers.
Solr can even talk binary over HTTP so there isn't even text or XML
parsing overhead.

Think of it like a database - the norm is to run it as a separate
server process.
Embedding is only something you should do if you have really
"interesting" requirements.

-Yonik
http://lucenerevolution.org  Lucene/Solr Conference, Boston Oct 7-8